Collaborative Teaming and Role Release

COLLABORATIVE TEAMING IN TRANSITIONING COMMUNICATION SERVICES

Today, we wanted to share with you this presentation that we gave at the ARC of Kentucky conference last month. According to their website, the ARC of Kentucky is a group that works toward advocacy and education of all children and adults with intellectual disabilities and their families. This power point is focused toward parent education, but it may be useful to you as well. A couple of highlights that may be helpful when talking with parents are:

The “5 questions to ask” — these are all important points that should be addressed with parents during ARC meetings.

and

This graphic— this may be useful when talking with parents about the eventual role release of communication services to other professionals.

As professionals, we need to be educating parents about this topic. How do you convey this message?

Should They Stay or Should They Go?

Today’s Post was prepared for you by Terri Bowles. She offers some suggestions and information about students who are transitioning to middle and high school. This post is accompanied by the “Transition Checklists” created by the middle/high PLC. Thanks to all of you for your work on these documents!

Which of my speech students should I send on to middle or high school?

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In an effort to find a way to help in the understanding of the complex differences between speech language services at elementary vs. middle/high, the Middle/High School PLC has spent some time putting together two “Checklists” and some tips/facts to help Elementary and Middle School SLPs work together when making decisions about some of those transitioning students they might have on their caseloads. We hope they help!

Middle and High School Speech Language Services;  The Big Picture;

  • Most middle and high schools have 6-7 periods lasting from 45 to 55 minutes each. Teachers want the students to be there for the rst 5 minutes of class to get the assignment and then release them.
  • LRE should be just like in elementary—no restrictions. Indicate special education:  speech language services OR Co teaching: speech language services.
  • Consider holding a transition meeting prior to the end of the 5th grade school year and amend the IEP to reflect speech/language time compatible with the Middle/High school schedules (i.e. 1 x 30 , 1 x 45, 1×50 if they are moving on with speech. The receiving SLP would love a call prior to the meeting to ask them how they schedule their students.
  • If you are sending students, make sure they have appropriate goals that warrant specific, direct service and that there are a manageable number to collect data.   Seventeen benchmarks are difficult on both the SLP and the student.
  • If you see there is a duplication in services with ECE services, the question needs to be, “Where is the adverse impact—communication or their main area of eligibility”?
  • Data for every goal is so important. This allows you to make sure the student is making adequate progress, been at a plateau level for an extended period of time or already met a goal or benchmark.
  • Contemplate releasing students who have reached 75% out of 80% accuracy.
  • It is most helpful as middle/high SLPs if we have a current KY Consent form with parent permission for a Type A reevaluation.

 

The Articulation and Language Checklists can be used, if you so choose, prior to scheduling the IEP meetings in the 5th and 8th grade years.  As Middle/High SLPs we have used them ourselves with our own caseload.  It was eye opening to see students from a different perspective.  We hope they are helpful and will be a great resource for you when thinking about students transitioning from one level to another.

Final Draft Articulation (PDF)

Final Language Checklist copy PDF

…But Social Media is Supposed to be Recreational!

I have found that if I am not careful, social media can be a black hole where my free time disappears. One minute I tap open the Pinterest app on my phone and before I know it, hours have passed and I have accomplished nothing! I know I’m not the only one who sometimes loses hours of time while browsing social media sites. However, there are ways to make our “idle” time more productive. The following is a quick overview of some ways that social media outlets can be used to improve your practice as an SLP.

Blog
A blog (short for “web log”) can be used to write about basically anything! There are all sorts of blog topics, including *you guessed it* speech therapy. ASHA has a blog called ASHAsphere. ASHAsphere covers a wide range of topics written by a variety of bloggers. One post in particular gives a fairly comprehensive list of other blogs that cover topics related to speech pathology. PediaStaff is a staffing company, but they publish a blog that is geared toward SLPs, OTs, PTs and School Psychologists.

YouTube
YouTube can be used to supplement your practice in a couple different ways. You can use it to find information and you can also use it to find videos to use in therapy. ASHA is also on the bandwagon with YouTube. You can find their channel by typing ASHAWeb into the YouTube search bar. This channel spotlights things like patient success stories, SIGs, and Autism Spectrum Disorders. Other channels include Autism Speaks, autismtreatment, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, Akron Children’s Hospital, SpeechLanguageBeyond, and sayitrightspeech just to list a few. EduTube is a resource that is similar to YouTube but geared toward education.

Pinterest
Pintrest is a great way to find resources that are available via the web. For those of you who aren’t “pinners” yet, Pinterest is a virtual cork board. You can follow other people and they can follow you. When you see pins from the people you are following that you like, you pin it to a board. You can also pin other things that you see online or even take a picture of something you have done and pin it to a specific board. Pintrest it’s self is really just a tool for collecting ideas, but following other speech therapists/speech therapy practices allows you to see what others are doing. You can follow people you know or perfect strangers.

Twitter
I have to admit, I have been slow in joining the Twitter revolution. In fact, I just started my Twitter account in preparation for this post. However, I know that it is a good way to stay connected with colleagues at the school level. Many principals tweet as a way of providing information to parents and staff alike. Even our own superintendent of schools tweets. How do you use twitter?

Facebook
This is where social media started, right? Facebook can also be a useful tool to stay in contact with other therapists. KSHA and ASHA both have Facebook pages. Both post links to articles, calls for action, photos and reminders. You can become “friends” with other therapists and join groups that are related to speech therapy. You can also link your Pinterest to your Facebook account.

What types of social media do you use? What are the benefits and draw backs to this type of communication? Are there things I have forgotten? Comment to share what you think!

*I/we do not represent any of the groups/individuals listed in this post. They are simply resources that are available to check out! As always, nothing can replace your professional judgment!

Welcome!

Welcome to our blog! We want to emphasize that this blog belongs to all SLPs in our school district. We will shape the design of this site to offer support and inspiration to assist in your daily work. Although your work leads you in different locations, the purpose of this blog is to help everyone feel connected as a cohesive group.

Here are some ways we recommend to use this resource:

¡ General information and job-specific resources

¡ Opportunities for inspiration

¡ Peer questions and answers

¡ Peer reviewed resources

¡ Professional learning opportunities

¡ Idea development

· Creative resource sharing – We want your FABULOUS and CREATIVE ideas.

¡ Colleague recognition and support

¡ Community building

Guest bloggers are welcome! We want to introduce a wide range of topics. Topic suggestions are welcome. If you have a special areas of interest and expertise, feel free to let us know.

Here are a few ground rules:

¡ Remember the ethical considerations surrounding confidentiality

¡ Be courteous and professional

· Stay positive – If there are concerns, please contact the speech office. We will be happy to listen and work to find a mutually agreed upon resolution.

· Be constructive, not destructive – Recommendations are welcome.

The speech office will have the final word on what is published on this blog.